Keep Leading!® Podcast Episode 032: The Reluctant Entrepreneur

Keep Leading!® Podcast Episode 032: The Reluctant Entrepreneur

Valda Ford
Health and Wellness Speaker and Cultural Competency Expert
The Reluctant Entrepreneur

Episode Summary
Valda is a “reluctant entrepreneur” who became a “serial entrepreneur.” She is passionate about doing good through her work and considers herself a “social entrepreneur.” She shares entrepreneurship lessons leaders can learn from.

Check out this 60 Second preview of the episode!

Bio
Valda Ford is a woman on a mission. Over the past thirty years, she has worked everywhere from war zones to refugee camps to board rooms. Her work has taken her to 57 countries with CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, tribal chiefs, Afghani teachers and Buddhist monks, health care professionals and law enforcers to improve health, decrease negative outcomes, enhance leadership skills, and decrease vulnerability.

Valda is a “serial” entrepreneur and has opened successful businesses in the US and the Caribbean. With graduate degrees in Nursing and Public health she is dedicated to simplifying health and wellness and uses her experience to bridge the gaps between the doctor and patient. Valda is also a certified sexuality expert and she believes that ignorance of sexual and reproductive health matters creates unnecessary heartbreak and illness.

Valda is a local radio celebrity, has produced over 100 podcasts, puts on her own relationship and sexual health seminars and is a frequently sought-after speaker and consultant. She has nearly 1/2 million followers on her Facebook page – Sex is Not for Sissies.

Website
www.ValdaFord.com

LinkedIn
https://www.linkedin.com/in/valdaford/

Twitter
https://twitter.com/valdaboydford

Leadership Quote
No one can stop you if you believe in yourself!

Subscribe, Share and Review

Transcript

If you’re a small business owner looking to grow or expand your business, check out OnDeck Business Loans. OnDeck offers business loans online from 5000 dollars to 500,000 dollars and their simple application process only takes 10 minutes. Unlike banks they’ll give you a decision quickly and funding in as fast as one day. Get a free consultation with an OnDeck loan adviser. Visit OnDeck.com/Podcast.

This podcast is part of the C Suite Radio Network, turning the volume up on business.

This podcast is sponsored by Grand Heron International. Through a growing network of credentialed and vetted coaches, Grand Heron International brings you on-demand coaching with coaching on site and the Coaching Assistance Program for corporations. Whether you are a company committed to investing in your leaders, an individual navigating a complex situation or a coach searching for a superb network of coaches, visit us at GrandHeronInternational.com.

Welcome to the Keep Leading Podcast, the podcast dedicated to promoting leadership development and sharing leadership insights. Here’s your host, the Leadership Excelerator, Eddie Turner.

Eddie Turner:
Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Keep Leading Podcast, the podcast dedicated to leadership development and leadership insights. I’m your host, Eddie Turner, the Leadership Excelerator. I work with leaders to accelerate performance and drive impact.

I am excited about my guest today. My guest today is Valda Ford. Valda is an internationally known expert on women’s health, leadership and cultural competency but there’s something extremely fascinating about Valda. Not only has she been featured on major media outlets but Valda has educated audiences in over 57 countries. Valda Ford is here with us today and it’s a delight.

Valda, welcome to the Keep Leading Podcast.

Valda Ford:
Thank you, Eddie. It’s such a pleasure to be here with you as you are helping leaders to just keep doing it beautifully and better.
Eddie Turner:
Well, thank you. So, Valda, I just said a little bit about who you are. Can you tell the listeners to this podcast more about your background?
Valda Ford:
Well, as far as my education, I am a registered nurse with a couple graduate degrees in Administration and Public Health Policy. I’ve had the opportunity to go from being a small-town girl to having lived all over the world. And that mainly started with the fact that I was broke and needed to pay my student loans. Someone reached out to me and asked me if I’d [Inaudible]. I know, I know. here I am sitting working two and a half to three jobs even as a licensed registered nurse. By then I was a divorced single parent. And so, things were tough plus I was paying off all my student loans. So, in the middle of the night, I got a call while I was working in a burn trauma unit. A recruiter asked me if I’d go to work in Saudi Arabia and I said “No” but then I said “Yes.”
Eddie Turner:
What made you change?
Valda Ford:
What made me change was, as I said, I was a single parent. So, I was thinking “How can I possibly go without my son?” because the contract at that point was for a single person traveling, not a family. And as it happens, with a serendipity, God’s will, my sister called and her husband had just been stationed in Germany. And we have the kind of family where we take each other’s children when the need is there. And I had not asked but she must have felt that that was a time and she reached out to me to say “Why don’t you send him over here with us? We live in a great place. He will have more exposure than he would ever have in small town America. He will get a chance to go to him and go out if he wants to go to the mountains.” And I understand that exposure can really help you get past any shortcomings you may have had from your original upbringing. And so, she asked at the right time and I was able to go get that financial monkey off my back by working In the Middle East.
Eddie Turner:
Isn’t that beautiful? So, you were able to accomplish some things that you did not think were within your reach. And then your son was able to develop in a different way as a young man.
Valda Ford:
Absolutely. He got a chance to be with international folks. He was around military people who were accustomed to being out and about, accustomed to having to make adjustments on the fly and he really is a different person for that.
Eddie Turner:
Wonderful. And I’m sure that that international experience comes to fore in his life on a daily basis.
Valda Ford:
It really does but the most important thing is that he has learned to accept people as they are, where they come from, what their parents look like, how they pray, and that has been just an amazing thing.
Eddie Turner:
Now, you have had this experience, as I mentioned in our opening, up in 57 different countries and is it sounds like obviously Saudi Arabia was one of them.
Valda Ford:
Yes.
Eddie Turner:
When I started to think about 57 countries, Valda, I don’t know that I’ve been to more than seven but 57, what is that like?
Valda Ford:
Well, the first time when they called me and asked me to go to Saudi Arabia, I was like “You must be crazy. I haven’t been to South Carolina yet. I’m a North Carolina girl.” I’m thinking “I haven’t been anywhere. You’re talking about going to the other side of the world” but I went. And that opened up my mind because I worked with people from 32 different countries, who had a different understanding of what it was like to be fluent in English, who had a different understanding of what a healthcare system should look like, who had a different impression of everything that is a part of culture, whether or not a man opens a door for a woman. Whether or not a nurse is independent or must have orders given to her directly by the doctor, whether or not we pray or proselytize, all of it was different. And so, going from a town that only now has about 100,000 people to have an opportunity to be with people from 32 different countries and to live and work on an organization, a base, a hospital owned by the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the Ministry of Aviation and Defense, I thought “Hmm, this is different” but I met many people who invited me whether on vacation or after my time finishing up in Saudi to say “Why don’t you come to Finland?” and “I need your expertise in burn therapy” or “Why don’t you come to Germany because I would love for you to meet my folks” or “Come hang out with us in Greece while we paint the Pantheon as our payment for staying in the place while we’re there.”
Eddie Turner:
My, my, my. Now, that sounds exciting and it sounds like just the opportunity of a lifetime.
Valda Ford:
Well, for me, coming from a small town, from a large family, not having had a lot of resources growing up, these were things I had not even imagined. I had always wanted to be an anthropologist but did not see that as a possibility because of the inability to be able to afford to go on those kinds of trips where you’re learning about cultures and even paying for college in general but this afforded me the opportunity to do a little bit of both. I got a chance to go to places that I wouldn’t normally go, many times not having to pay the whole freight. So, if I knew someone who lived in Australia, I could just visit them but most of my travel, quite honestly, was much later and with that I was working more from the public health stance of developing sustainable healthcare programs, working with organizations that restore side or decrease conflict and I may have been paid to go there or had someone to underwrite the trips.
Eddie Turner:
All right. Well, you talked about the fact of how your son changed because of his international exposure and you’ve talked about what the international exposure allows you to do voluntarily but what else did international exposure in 57 different lands do for you as a person?
Valda Ford:
I think the most important thing it did for me, especially since I work a lot with vulnerable people, is I got a chance to just shut down my whining, whatever it might be, just shut it down. The things that I might feel inconvenienced by or wish that I had more of are things that so many people in the world don’t even have the opportunity to have, whether that’s the ability to go to college as a woman, even to go to primary school as a woman, the ability to pray however I choose, to speak out if I don’t like what’s going on politically, the ability in general to have safety. That is something that I found as I traveled around the world, as I worked in war zones in Africa or went in right after the fall of the Taliban in Afghanistan or went into Sri Lanka after the tsunami of 2004. I’m just seeing that things that I had taken for granted, having the ability to cook on a stove instead of a charcoal pot or knowing that I’ll have clean fresh running water, all those things made me better able to deal with things that might aggravate and break people because I knew that I was so much more blessed than, I would say, half of the world that I had no reason to complain. And I definitely believe that to whom much is given, much is required. And it just made me redouble my efforts to want to do better for people of the world.
Eddie Turner:
Now, you talked about your work there in war torn lands and refugee camps but you’ve also done a lot of work at the C-level in boardrooms and working with executives in Fortune 500 companies. I mean, that’s quite a span and a range and the depth that you’re actually bringing to your clients. What would you say is the biggest thing that stands out to you that you’re able to bring because of your vast experiences in both worlds?
Valda Ford:
I think that what I’m able to do that’s helpful for people in the C-suite, especially if they represent global interest, is to really give them the man or woman on the street perspective of what’s going on in those countries. We really have some misinterpretations of what life is like every day for people. Even if they’re living on a dollar a day, their way of being and doing is pretty much our way of being and doing. They want to have a better life for their children. They want to be safe. They want to produce better than the generation before them. So, that’s pretty much universal but then we look at the fact that we have our ugly Americanisms going on. So, when I go into the C-suite, many times, say there’s a conversation about increasing diversity, and maybe if they’re looking in the field of information technology, they may be feeling like “I need to bring in executives from Asia.” There’s no doubt that about 50% or more of IT degrees or especially graduate degrees are taken by people who are coming in from Asia. And that’s fine because that’s their sub-specialty and they’re really good at it. However, if a C-suite person says to me the reason we don’t have more diversity from within the United States is because the pool is too small and there’s no one who’s able to take those positions, I can talk to them about the kids who are living in the farm belt or the rust belt or whatever belt like ours is the kidney stone belt, whichever belt it is, to say “Yeah. Well, you may not readily see how you can increase the diversity of the people living in the United States but if you are a person who’s a true corporate citizen, isn’t it your responsibility to give back to the community in which you have your company where you’re getting your tax benefits, where your children go to school? Don’t you want it be where the people who live in your community have the ability to get the jobs at your company to excel at your company’s jobs and then to increase the opportunity for more diversity that’s local?” And when they come back to me like “Well, we don’t have anyone doing this or that,” I say “Well, this is your opportunity to develop pipeline programs.” For instance, in nursing, nursing is my foundational education, and they’re always about a million nurses short of what is needed for the demand. That’s a million.
Eddie Turner:
Wow! That’s staggering.
Valda Ford:
It is staggering. And the reason is … Well, I could go into 400 reasons why nursing will always have a shortage but I remember once being asked by a college president and his board of regents about increasing the numbers of minority nurses. In this particular case, they were looking at African-American Nurses and they said “We can’t get any African-American nurses who live in this town to go to our nursing school. So, we have sent recruiters to Alabama and Mississippi.” This happened to be in the Midwest at the time. “So, we’ve sent people to Alabama and Mississippi to get people who want to be nurses to come up here. We’re going to give them a four-year scholarship. We’re going to give them housing.” And I said “You must be crazy to think that there are no people in this town who would take a four-year scholarship and housing and the ability to have their education underwritten and want to be a registered nurse.”
Eddie Turner:
You told him just like that?
Valda Ford:
Absolutely, absolutely. What I bring to the table is just the lack of truth. I just say “I am who I am. You get me like I am. And I know how to carry on a conversation whether or not you’re offended.”
Eddie Turner:
All right.
Valda Ford:
But they know coming in that they got on to talking to them. I’m not trying to be the person who’s so busy worrying about the next contract that I’m not giving them what they want because I think that’s what they hire me for. So, I say “If you believe that there’s no one in this town who wants the same opportunity that you’re sending people to Mississippi and Alabama, number one, you’re going to bring back people from a different culture into this neighborhood while I believe you could go to the other side of town and get people.” So, they challenged me with that. And don’t you know, I said, “You give me the right to go out and find 10 African-American nurses who want this same opportunity. I will have them for you within a month and they will be qualified.” Well …
Eddie Turner:
All right.
Valda Ford:
I could get them in a week but I didn’t want them to think that it was that easy.
Eddie Turner:
So, you stretched it out a little bit.
Valda Ford:
I stretched it out a little bit just to let them know, number one, that the opportunity was there but that there did need to be some due diligence in who I was getting. I didn’t just want to get 10 people who happen to be African-American, which is sometimes what happens. So, when I talk to C-suite people, I have the opportunity to speak to them as a pee because I am a serial entrepreneur, I’ve owned my own business, I’ve had 200 employees working for me, I opened the first cardiac stroke and physical rehabilitation center in the Caribbean, I had my own high-tech home healthcare nursing service back when no one went home on ventilators but I did ventilator support at home and took care of HIV patients when it was very unpopular to do. So, I can talk to them with the real understanding of what it’s like to have everything on the line if your job is not done well and I think they respect that.
Eddie Turner:
So, you have this global competency that you’re bringing. You have this diversity component in terms of your experience in diverse places with diverse people. And you use some of that, from what I read, to build a center for human diversity. Can you tell us a little bit more about that?
Valda Ford:
Well, when I came back from Saudi Arabia, people started to ask me “How was it possible for you to be able to give good care when you had people coming from different places when we were working with the Saudi military?” So, I wasn’t in Saudi Arabia working with expatriates. I was working with Saudi military and their family. And they said “Well, how did you do that?” And I would talk about the need for appropriate and good and available interpretation services. And then when I worked in the Caribbean, people would ask me or how did this happen in Afghanistan. So, over time, I was getting worn down with trying to answer this question over and over and over and over again. Also, it wasn’t a good method for anyone to really learn anything. In the diversity and inclusion game, unfortunately, a lot of people are just interested in doing a little checkbox to say “We did this thing. We had Cinco de Mayo. We had some appreciation of African-Americans by having some collard greens on the menu. And we did this and this. We had Chinese New Year celebration” but they were not doing the things that would really make change in the culture of the company. And so, I would talk to them and determine that the best way to do it would be to develop a center with a loan-term program, not just a lunch and learn, not just a one-day workshop, not a two-day retreat but a full year of bringing together mid-level and higher executives who were decision makers in the companies to sit together as a cohort. I would have approximately 20 people together from 10 different companies. They would start together. We would do that retreat where we do some breaking down but then, every month we would get together for at least eight hours and we would talk specifically about issues that were germane to their businesses. And that might be recruitment. It might be retention. It might be “What do I do when I have a person who now wants to take three breaks a day because they want to pray?” or “Wants to have a head covering?” And I would say “Okay. So, you’re worried about people praying three times a day. What do your smokers do? How long are they off?”
Eddie Turner:
Yes.
Valda Ford:
And they would be like “Oh, well, I don’t know.” I say “Do you restrict smokers from going to take a smoke break or do you just let them decide if it’s reasonable, if there’s someone to cover them if it’s a critical area?” and they said “Yes.” – “So, what’s the difference? People go to pray for five minutes. This is not going away for 30 minutes three times a day. This is two to five minutes of someone being away from the desk in order to pray. It’s like going away for meditation or three to five minutes or just going to walk up and down a flight of steps for two to five minutes. If you don’t reject that, why would you reject this?” And so, I developed a center where people got to think critically about the issues that were going on in their organizations. I made them familiar with the laws, things like the culturally and linguistically appropriate services standards that really do guide how we should do things in our organizations. And it worked beautifully. They were very satisfied that not only did they know more but they knew when they didn’t know enough.
Eddie Turner:
How about that? How about that? That is something.

So, there’s been a lot of research done about the idea that diversity is important, not just so that an organization doesn’t get sued or so they can check the box. Diverse organizations are actually more profitable because when you have the right people in the room at the table, there’s a lot of mistakes you can avoid making because someone’s going to ask a question that you would not have thought to ask, as you quite eloquently illustrated there, and what you ask and got them to think about differently. So, thank you for sharing that with us, Valda.

Valda Ford:
My pleasure.
Eddie Turner:
What I’d like to do now is to pause and let’s have a word from our sponsor.

This podcast is sponsored by Eddie Turner LLC. Organizations who need to accelerate the development of their leaders call Eddie Turner, the Leadership Excelerator. Eddie works with leaders to accelerate performance and drive impact. Call Eddie Turner to help your leaders one on one as their coach or to inspire them as a group through the power of facilitation or a keynote address. Visit EddieTurnerLLC.com to learn more.

This is John Perry, organization and leadership development consultant and strategic coach, and you’re listening to the Keep Leading Podcast with Eddie Turner.

Eddie Turner:
So, we’re back now, everyone, and we are talking to Valda Ford. She is an internationally known expert on women’s health, leadership and cultural competency. And she has educated audiences in over 57 different countries. Absolutely fascinating.

So, glad to have you with us here, Valda. And you mentioned earlier that you are a serial entrepreneur and that you’ve started several businesses even in other countries. Tell us a little bit more about those businesses. You told us about the cardiac …

Valda Ford:
Rehab.
Eddie Turner:
I’m getting all tongue tied saying this.
Valda Ford:
Okay. Well, my first business was a high-tech home healthcare business. And let me say, I’m a serial entrepreneur but I was a reluctant entrepreneur. I had no desire at all to be responsible for anybody except me. I wanted a paycheck that come in every week, two weeks, a month.

I didn’t want to be worried about it but I got involved in something and I saw a way to solve a problem. And at the same time, I ended up being a social entrepreneur. So, I do well by doing good. And that was how I got started. And so, I started this high-tech home healthcare business where I just wanted to solve one problem but it ended up where I had 200 plus nurses working for me doing high-tech work. Then when I was in the Virgin Islands, I started a cardiac stroke and physical rehabilitation business because even though we’re at least a thousand miles out in the water away from the US mainland, I saw many young people, people in their 30s and 40s, having strokes and heart attacks. And then the burden would be so great for them to be able to get care, to be able to fly away to DC or Florida or even to Puerto Rico. It meant that there was a big cultural shift for them. And anyone who’s been ill for any amount of time understands how important it is to have family and a good support system there. And that’s nearly impossible when you have to go a thousand miles away for care. So, I needed to have eight people to break even the first day when we started the cardiac stroke and physical rehab business and I had eight people. And so, needing eight to 10 people a day to break even basically got into having 77 to 80 people a day in the center because, one, we were physically there but, two, it was set up in such a way that it rivaled centers on the US mainland. And here’s a tip for people who are entrepreneurs or looking at starting something. When I needed to start those businesses, I knew nothing about them. The nursing service, of course, I was a registered nurse and I knew how to be a good registered nurse but I nearly killed myself by not understanding some business principles and how to protect myself physically and emotionally and psychologically and just giving myself time to rest. We know about self-care now but I’m not sure that it was something that was a buzzword then.

Eddie Turner:
So, that was one of the biggest lessons, you’d say, that you learned as a business leader?
Valda Ford:
Absolutely. You should work hard but you should not kill yourself. And you should learn to work smarter. And that is something that I was able to do along the way. So, when I started my next business, I thought “Okay, I don’t want to make those same mistakes. I don’t know a lot about rehabilitation services.” So, I went to the US. I went to Emory University Medical Center and a major center in Florida and I said “Look, can I learn from you?” The beautiful thing is because I was at least a thousand miles away from them, they did not feel like I was competing with them. And so, they were quite welcoming to me to say “Come into our facility. Stay a couple of weeks. Learn all our policies and procedures. Learn what we do. Learn what works and what doesn’t work.” And I was able to get like a graduate level education in a few months by learning from the best people and not by trying to just do it all myself.
Eddie Turner:
Excellent. I love how you said you are a serial entrepreneur who was a reluctant entrepreneur who became a social entrepreneur. So, what advice would you give to other leaders who are listening to what you’re talking about, about the business aspect? You talked about the self-care, don’t work yourself to death, and then investing in your own education and learning from others. Is there anything else that should be considered?
Valda Ford:
The number one thing is to believe in yourself but have a plan. So, don’t just have a pie in the sky idea. Do some research. Find out if what you want to do is really needed or necessary there. If it’s not known that is necessary, what will you do to get people to understand that it’s necessary, like diversity and inclusion. Before I developed my center, a lot of people were just having people come in and do lunch and learns. And if I would say “No, that’s not a good model. You need to do this for a year. You need to invest in two people in your organization for a year,” I had to be able to convince them. So, take care of yourself, do your research and understand how to have the conversation to convince people that they need you whether it is for financial reasons, ethical reasons or humanistic reasons.
Eddie Turner:
So, have the conversation that they need you. Be able to sell yourself is what I think you’re saying,
Valda Ford:
Be able to sell yourself in a way that it doesn’t feel like a sales presentation. It is about “Wow! I hadn’t thought about it that way.” Have the conversation that makes sense to them. It’s definitely the “What’s in it for me?”, speaking about what’s in it for them.
Eddie Turner:
All right. I like that. Thank you for sharing that. You are more than just a health and wellness expert and a leadership expert. You’re actually something of a radio celebrity. And I didn’t learn this until very, very recently that you are also a podcast host and you have done over 150 episodes of your own and you have about a half million followers on Facebook.
Valda Ford:
That’s right.
Eddie Turner:
So, how did you accomplish all this? Tell me a little bit more about this aspect of your business and how you built up this strong media presence.
Valda Ford:
Interestingly, when I was doing the work with diversity and cultural competency, I was approached by a health organization to say “Please help us get our community to understand what’s going on regarding sexually transmitted diseases, now called sexually transmitted infections in the community.” And I thought “I’m not the least bit interested in talking about sex. What’s wrong with you?” but I know that I am a person who’s very good at having difficult conversations. So, I took that on. And when I took it on, I realized that the approach that we have throughout government agencies now is still not the best. We look at who has this issue and then we try to say why you shouldn’t do this thing – “Don’t have sex without protection. Don’t do this. Wait until blah, blah.” We always come from the negative. And I recognized that while we’re teaching teens that they should not do things to get themselves pregnant or get diseases, we’re not teaching grown people. And the best lessons that we get and the ones that stick …
Eddie Turner:
But don’t grown folks know everything?
Valda Ford:
Well, if they’re like me, they’ve got the same kind of lessons I did, where my mama told me to keep my knees closed and that was the beginning and the end of my sex education lesson.
Eddie Turner:
Yes, ma’am.
Valda Ford:
So, here’s the challenge. I’m trying to talk to parents about keeping their kids in sex ed classes, not pulling them out, not having them opt out in schools. And as I talked to the parents, they would say “Really? Is that what you’re talking about? What does that mean? What do you mean my child might be doing those things?” And over time, parents started to say to me “Will you teach us?” So, I believe that my niche in that was to talk to grown people. I can talk to grown people, give them all the biological, psychological, financial repercussions of doing or not doing. Then when they understand and also, they learn that it’s not just about the no’s, it’s about the yeses, it’s about the pleasure part of sex, let’s do the whole continuum. Don’t just teach things not to do. Let’s teach about pleasure and protection all at the same time. And then the parents can add their own ideals, religious preferences, cultural norms to the conversation once they feel comfortable. So, now I have people from about 25 countries who follow me on Facebook. I do a radio program on 102 Jams, an Intercom company, every month. And with that I have people in half the state that listen in and call in. And along with that, I have my podcast which is now on I-Heart and a couple of other mediums like that that might be reaching about 3 million people.
Eddie Turner:
Unbelievable.
Valda Ford:
I love it.
Eddie Turner:
Well, that’s extremely impressive. And as a podcast host myself, I can only hope to get a fraction of your success. I am so proud of you. And, just as I said earlier, it’s just absolutely impressive. I’ve run out of adjectives to describe you and what you have accomplished. And so, I was impressed with you when I met you. And that’s why I just really wanted my listeners to get a chance to hear from you and to be able to understand that there’s a business component to health, that there is a way for all of us to awaken the entrepreneur inside of us, and I love how you said even if it’s a reluctant entrepreneur, and to be able to accomplish things we would never have imagined, and the things that you’ve done around diversity and inclusion and giving a voice to people who wouldn’t otherwise have a voice. You’re just phenomenal.

What’s one last piece of advice that you would give to leaders listening to our conversation today so that they can keep leading?

Valda Ford:
Well, I believe that being in business is not always easy but it should ultimately bring you joy. Think about the things that make you happy, whether it’s making you happy personally or making you happy because you see it uplifting someone else. We can always be the ones to give a hand up and at the same time benefit from it financially, personally, and in our souls because no one can stop you if you believe in yourself and believe in what you’re doing.
Eddie Turner:
Well, all right. I love it. Thank you so much for being with us today on the Keep Leading Podcast.
Valda Ford:
It’s my pleasure always and you keep leading.
Eddie Turner:
Thank you. Where can my listeners learn more about you?
Valda Ford:
They can email me at Valda@ValdaFord.com. If they want to look at my Facebook page, it’s ‘Sex Is Not for Sissies’, meaning a person who is afraid. And I have a website by the same name. So, Valda@ValdaFord.com. I’m always happy to reach out to those who are trying to lead like you are, Eddie. Thank you so much.
Eddie Turner:
Well, thank you.

And thank you for listening. That concludes this episode, everyone. I’m Eddie Turner, the Leadership Excelerator, reminding you that leadership is not about our title or our position. Leadership is an activity. Leadership is action. It’s not the case of once a leader, always a leader. It’s not a garment we put on and take off. We must be a leader at our core and allow it to emanate in all we do. So, whatever you’re doing, always keep leading.

Thank you for listening to your host Eddie Turner on The Keep Leading Podcast. Please remember to subscribe to The Keep Leading Podcast on iTunes or wherever you listen. For more information about Eddie Turner’s work please visit EddieTurnerLLC.com.

Thank you for listening to C Suite Radio, turning the volume up on business.

The Keep Leading!™ podcast is for people passionate about leadership. It is dedicated to leadership development and insights. Join your host Eddie Turner, The Leadership Excelerator® as he speaks with accomplished leaders and people of influence across the globe as they share their journey to leadership excellence. Listen as they share leadership strategies, techniques and insights. For more information visit eddieturnerllc.com or follow Eddie Turner on Twitter and Instagram at @eddieturnerjr. Like Eddie Turner LLC on Facebook. Connect with Eddie Turner on LinkedIn.