Keep Leading!® Podcast 062 | Leader as Coach | Jennifer Hall

Keep Leading!® Podcast 062 | Leader as Coach | Jennifer Hall

Jennifer Hall
Executive Coach, Leadership Trainer and Assessment Author
Leader as Coach

Episode Summary
Dr. Jennifer Hall is an executive coach, leadership trainer and Co-author of the Entrepreneurial Mindset Profile (EMP) and the Coaching Mindset Index (CMI). We discussed why all leaders should also be a coach.

Check out the “60-Second Preview” of this episode!

Bio
Dr. Jen Hall is an executive coach, leadership trainer and assessment author. A systems thinker who understands and attends to both individual and organizational dynamics, Jen brings to her coaching and speaking engagements a high level of energy, a sense of humor, and a strong bias for action. Jen spent almost 20 years as a coaching talent manager—selecting, developing and managing executive coaches—for the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) or one of its Network Associates. In 2015, she launched her own business, Mindset Coaching. The Entrepreneurial Mindset Profile™ (EMP), one of the two assessments Jen co-authored, measures 14 dimensions that have been found to distinguish business owners from corporate managers. The Coaching Mindset Index (CMI), available in both self-report and 360-degree formats, enables leaders and organizations to understand and enhance the strategies they use to grow and develop their staff. Jen is a 2019 graduate of the Oxford Brooks Coaching Supervision Programme. A licensed psychologist and Board-Certified Coach, Jen holds a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Connecticut and a B.S. degree from Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. She lives with her husband and two children in Redington Beach, Florida.

Website
https://drjenhall.com/

LinkedIn
https://www.linkedin.com/in/drjenniferhall

Twitter
https://twitter.com/drjenhall_

Leadership Quote
“Before you are a leader, success is all about growing yourself. When you become a leader, success is all about growing others.”—Jack Welch

Subscribe, Share and Review

Full Episode Transcripts and Detailed Guest Information
www.KeepLeadingPodcast.com

Keep Leading LIVE (Live Recordings of the Keep Leading!® Podcast)
www.KeepLeadingLive.com

Transcript

The key to sustainable leadership lies in the ability to thrive during uncertainty, ambiguity, and change. Grand Heron International brings you the Coaching Assistance Program, giving your employees on-demand coaching to manage through a challenging situation and arrive at a solution. Visit GrandHeronInternational.Ca/Podcast to learn more.

This podcast is part of the C Suite Radio Network, turning the volume up on business.

Welcome to the Keep Leading!® Podcast, the podcast dedicated to promoting leadership development and sharing leadership insights. Here’s your host, The Leadership Excelerator®, Eddie Turner.

Eddie Turner:
Hello, everyone! Welcome to the Keep Leading!® Podcast, the podcast the podcast dedicated to leadership development and insights. I’m your host Eddie Turner, The Leadership Excelerator®. I work with leaders to accelerate performance and drive impact through the power of facilitation, executive and leadership coaching, and professional speaking.

21st century culture and norms have really changed the prism leadership is viewed in. Long gone are the days of command and control. Long gone is the emphasis on formal authority alone to be an effective leader. Many today are seeing an emphasis being placed on a more participative style of leadership. What we’re now seeing is a movement toward where a leader is not only a doer but a model of what to do and a coach of how to do it.

Today, we will discuss leader as coach. We’ll explain what this means and what it looks like and how to do it. I have just the expert for this topic. With me today is Dr. Jennifer Hall. Dr. Jennifer Hall is an executive coach, leadership trainer, and assessment author. She’s a systems thinker who understands and attends to both the individual and organizational dynamics. She’s worked with hundreds of leaders and I happen to know one of her clients and I am extremely impressed with who she’s coaching and what I have heard about the level of competence and depth that she brings to the leader development space. So, I’m excited to have her with me here today.

Dr. Hall, welcome to the Keep Leading!® Podcast.

Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Thank you so much, Eddie. I really appreciate you having me on your fabulous and award-winning podcast. By the way congrats on its success.
Eddie Turner:
Well, thank you. You’re great, Dr. Hall. I appreciate that. Tell me what I missed.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
That was a lovely and a generous introduction, Eddie. I do appreciate it. I think of myself as being someone who supports leaders in whatever way they want and need at the particular time, given their context. So, in addition to doing individual executive coaching which I love, I also facilitate leadership and team-building workshops. It’s one of my favorite things to do. And then the third main area of my work has to do with the development of assessments. So, I have co-authored too the Coaching Mindset Index through AIIR Consulting and also the Entrepreneurial Mindset Profile through Eckerd College.
Eddie Turner:
Yes, I read about your work with assessments and I must admit, I’m fascinated by that. I’ve become certified in several and I know how much work it takes to become certified and master an assessment. I know nothing about what it takes to create one. And the fact that you’ve created not just one but two that are widely used by reputable coaches is extremely impressive to me. So, congratulations.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Thanks very much, Eddie. I really didn’t have much of a sense of how much work it was either when I started. I had two great professors who helped me learn about assessment. One is an undergraduate, Dr. Sharon Hershberger and then graduate school, Dr. Julian Rotter was my assessment professor. And I don’t know if you’ve heard of Dr. Rotter but he wrote a theory called Social Learning Theory and one of the terms he coined as part of that is very well known and that’s ‘Locus of Control’. So, he was a very inspirational and influential professor of mine. And I didn’t really know I would have any opportunity to help create these assessments once I was out of school and fully at work but they were interesting opportunities and I’m really glad to have participated.
Eddie Turner:
That’s an interesting theory. Can you share what the Locus of Control means for our leaders who may not have exposure to it?
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Sure, absolutely. So, there are two kinds of loci, I guess you could say, of control – internal versus external. And folks with an external locus of control see the things that happen to them as resulting from luck or good fortune or external causes. So, for example, if I fail a test, the professor wasn’t fair or my roommate distracted me from studying. People with an internal locus of control see themselves as the agents of the outcomes in their lives. So, it really is helpful to have an internal locus of control because then you feel powerful as if you can really make a difference.
Eddie Turner:
Yes. And tell us the reason why this matters for leaders. You mentioned their ability to make the difference, to be able to make the difference depending how they see it. tell us why this matters as a leader who’s going to be a coach.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Yeah, that’s a great question. And as I think about making the connection between locus of control and leader as coach, I think the primary influence it would have is that you can see as a leader that the person you’re coaching can in fact make changes. I see that as leaders and frankly as human beings, it’s really easy to pigeonhole people and to declare that they won’t get it or that they’ve always been problematic or they’re just not coachable. And to adopt an internal locus of control and a coaching mindset for a leader is to say “Well, let me see what there is that I can do, how I can intervene, what kind of questions I can ask to better understand this person’s motivations, their needs, their challenges, their context so that together we can unlock a path forward to make a change that is both meaningful and sustainable?” So, in that way, it’s similar, Eddie, I think, to what we do as executive coaches. And, although we don’t expect leaders to have the same level of training necessarily as trained executive coaches, in both situations we’re trying to unlock somebody’s potential. And I think having an internal locus of control and a coaching mindset are really key in doing that.
Eddie Turner:
Absolutely. Thank you for explaining that. That is so, so important. And in many organizations, both large and small, people are seeing the need for more executive coaching and in many areas pushing it down to lower levels of the organization, not just the senior ranks, where they’re bringing in leadership coaching and supporting different layers of their organizations. They’re recognizing that it’s a key leadership competency.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Yes.
Eddie Turner:
What do you think is the reason for this?
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Well, I think it’s related to exactly what you said, which is that organizations are increasingly recognizing the need for folks, not at the top levels, to optimize their potential, to be the best version of themselves. And executive coaching, as you know, isn’t cheap. Obviously, there’s a great ROI when it’s done well but it’s still hard for organizations to justify providing executive coaching at all levels. And therefore, what they’re expecting, and I think reasonably so, is that they can bring in executive coaches for the top levels of the organization but then it’s the leaders themselves who are going to have to expand that coaching capacity within the organization by providing not executive coaching but good powerful coaching conversations themselves that have the same impact of helping people who report to them to identify and achieve really important goals. And, as you mentioned before, the old command and control model simply doesn’t really unlock people’s potential in the same way that coaching conversations do.
Eddie Turner:
Absolutely. The manager, the supervisor, the leader at whatever level they are, who understands the power of coaching is able to unlock the potential of an employee in ways that no other leadership style does. And, given the dynamics and the demographics that we have in the workforce today, it’s more critical than ever before.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Exactly. Well said.
Eddie Turner:
Now, leaders who recognize this come to another revelation and it’s that there’s not enough training to develop these types of skills. I happen to be one of the facilitators for ATD where ATD is addressing this through the Coaching Certificate Program where we help folks who don’t want to become certified coaches, they’re just managers, supervisors, leaders who say “I want to be a coach first and a manager second.” So, that’s one program I know of. Are there other programs that you can recommend to our leaders who are listening where they can develop coaching skills?
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
That’s so interesting and I’d love to hear more about the ATD program, Eddie. In my experience, what happens is that organizations will send leaders to coaching programs, coaching trainings but the training oftentimes isn’t sticky. You know what I mean by that? They don’t remember it. And if they don’t remember it, they can’t put it into use. And that’s why my colleague of many, many years Dr. Mark Davis and I a few years ago decided to create a coaching framework that was also an assessment. So, for example, I often talk to groups of leaders, I was talking to a group of leaders just last week and I said “Okay, there are 20 people in the room.” And I said “How many of you have been to some kind of coaching skills training program?” And about half of them raised their hands. I said “Okay, how many of you can actually remember the model or the framework or even the acronym, even if you don’t remember what it stands for?” And the number of hands went down dramatically to about two.
Eddie Turner:
That’s something.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
And I said “Okay, how many of you, which ones of you can actually explain that model and use it?” and both hands went down.
Eddie Turner:
So, you went from 50% of the road to only 2% to 0.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Yeah, exactly. So, what that means is that for whatever reason these models might be good, the frameworks might be good but they’re not sticky. And so, Mark and I created, in conjunction with AIIR Consulting, the Coaching Mindset Index which presents a framework for what a leader as a coach does, the six overall coaching strategies they have available to them, different styles they can use and it helps give them a current status for where they are right now on those six overall coaching behaviors compared to the norm group. And then they get to decide where do they want to turn that up or turn that down. So, for example, one of the coaching foundations is finding solutions and the two strategies under finding solutions are advocacy which is what we call the push strategy and inquiry which is what we call the pull strategy. Many leaders find that they’re higher on advocacy than on inquiry which might work fine when they’re in that kind of managerial mindset but in order to have a truly powerful coaching conversation, many of them identify that they want to up the level of inquiry they use. They want to ask more truly open-ended probing questions that come from a place of curiosity and learning. And so, taking the assessment, getting the scores and then setting goals helps them identify very specifically what they’re already, doing what they want to do more of or less of and in that way, we believe, the model of the process is a little stickier. And we also, when we administer the Coaching Mindset Index to groups of leaders, we have them do a lot of practice. So, they get feedback on what they’re actually doing according to observers. It may or may not align with how they see themselves coaching but either way, it helps bring the concepts to life and gives them more clarity and more direction about what they actually want to do when they go back into the workplace and have the coaching conversations. I think, that’s why those are working, these particular workshops are working so well for us.
Eddie Turner:
So, the Coaching Mindset Index is what you would recommend to make it sticky.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Well, yes, but I am a very passionate advocate for this process. I had tremendous success with that.
Eddie Turner:
And where can leaders learn more about the Coaching Mindset Index?
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
The website is CoachingMindset.net.
Eddie Turner:
Wonderful. Thank you for sharing that, Dr. Hall.

I’m talking to Dr. Jennifer Hall. She’s a psychologist, executive coach, and leadership speaker and we’re talking about leader as coach. We’ll have more with Dr. Hall right after this.

Hey C Suite Radio listeners, Gregg Greenberg, General Manager of C-Suite Radio here. If you’re enjoying this great show, then you’re obviously aware of the power and explosive growth of podcasting. That said, you may not know the amazing reach and ease of podcast advertising. Here are the C Suite Radio Network, we have 150 podcasts reaching millions of listeners each month and all with affordable advertising slots ready to promote you and your business. We even help create and record your ad at no extra charge. From business to lifestyle and entertainment, we have shows that target your audience. We even have the technology to geo-target ads. So, why not speak to directly to your customers right where they live in and on the podcast they love. Reach out to C Suite by email and me at Gregg.Greenberg@C-SuiteNetwork.com.

This podcast is sponsored by Eddie Turner LLC. Organizations who need to accelerate the development of their leaders call Eddie Turner, The Leadership Excelerator®. Eddie works with leaders to accelerate performance and drive impact. Call Eddie Turner to help your leaders one on one as their coach or to inspire them as a group through the power of facilitation or a keynote address. Visit EddieTurnerLLC.com to learn more.

This is Gen. Tom Kolditz, the founding Executive Director for the Doerr Institute for New Leaders at Rice University and you’re listening to the Keep Leading!® Podcast with Eddie Turner.

Eddie Turner:
We’re back, everyone. I’m talking to the amazing Dr. Jennifer Hall. She’s a psychologist, executive coach, and leadership speaker. And before the break, we were talking about the Coaching Mindset Index and that this is a great tool to use, an assessment that takes any coaching skills that leaders learn and makes it sticky.

You also have the Entrepreneurial Mindset Profile that you authored. Can you tell us about that assessment and in which scenario one should be used over the other?

Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Sure, of course. The Entrepreneurial Mindset Profile was developed, in fact, not to be used with business owners or budding entrepreneurs, although, in fact, it is used very often with entrepreneurship students in universities but the idea at first was that not only entrepreneurs or business owners but also corporate and organizational leaders can benefit from operating with the mindset of an entrepreneur. So, we developed it because we wanted to use it in the programs that we were running with corporate leaders. And the way it’s structured is kind of like the Coaching Mindset Index. We’re not being prescriptive. We’re not saying “This is how you should coach and here’s how you should score” but rather we’re just presenting data to people and letting them decide do they feel good about where their scores are and the behaviors that underlie those scores or do they want to make some changes. So, when a leader takes the Entrepreneurial Mindset, what they will see is how they score on 14 discrete scales, things like action, orientation and persistence and passion and how those scores compare to those of an entrepreneur norm group and a corporate manager norm group. And in that way, they can see how they are most similar to entrepreneurs, where their strengths are in entrepreneurial thought and action, and where they score lower. The high scores can be thought of as strengths and the low scores may or may not be problematic. It all depends on the context. So, I love giving EMP to leaders who have recognized that to be successful, it would help them to think in some ways like an entrepreneur. And I love to give the Coaching Mindset Index to leaders for whom coaching and developing their direct reports is a very important mandate of their job. Sometimes it’s both.
Eddie Turner:
Excellent. Thank you for sharing that because many leaders like assessments and they would like to know how to access these and when they would want to use one over the other. So, you for sharing.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
You’re welcome.
Eddie Turner:
Now, if coaching skills are so important for leaders, why are they not better at it?
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
It’s a great question and I thought a lot about this. And, I think, it’s because leaders are told to coach, they’re expected to coach but they’re not given either the right kind of training or enough training. And in the absence of that, what I think most of them do is they sit down and they have a conversation and they bring their own meaning to term ‘coaching’, they define it differently. So, for one leader, coaching might mean having a really honest and difficult conversation about poor performance and for another, it might be “Hey, share encouragements and celebrate wins” and for a third leader, it might be something else entirely. I was talking to a CEO last week and she was asking me to come up and help her leaders with coaching because she said “We have the right mindset. We all believe that coaching is important and we’re scheduling meetings with our direct reports once a week” which is a lot actually but it’s not what I consider a transactional conversation – “What have you done, what needs to get done, etc.?” – but when it’s more about coaching and development, they have the right mindset but what are they actually going to sit down and say? What are they going to do? How are they going to conceive of that individual’s needs in the moment and what are the implications for then how they need to intervene. So, I think, that’s why we’re not that good.

The other thing is, and you probably saw this Harvard Business Review article that came out, I think, it’s a couple of years ago now, about leader as coach and the authors, and I’m sorry, I forget the names right now, but the authors interviewed all these leaders and they said “Okay, how are you at coaching?” and they said “Well, we’re okay.” – “Okay, we’ll sit down and coach.” And they did that and they had this conversation. Do you remember this article?

Eddie Turner:
Yes.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
So, you remember the leader said “Oh yeah, we did pretty well at coaching” and the people they coached, yeah, they were pretty good. And all these professional coaches were sitting in the room and they said something like “Well, you didn’t ask a single question” or “The questions you asked were really yes/no questions, no suggestions.” So, I think that even when leaders believe that they’re coaching, a) they have different definitions and b) they’re not actually that self-aware of what good coaching looks like or what they’re doing. So, I think those are the reasons why it’s so important that they get good training and good support.
Eddie Turner:
Wonderful. And I appreciate you sharing that article. It is important. And so many times, leaders who call themselves coaches or having a coaching conversation, they’re doing that, to your point that you explained so beautifully, through their prism, through what they see it as because they haven’t been trained, they don’t know. And, as the article said, your professional coaches say they are watching in horror.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Right. And we’ve all seen that and I’m sure that you’ve observed some of your clients as they were coaching someone else. And you can see that their intent is great, they want to make a positive difference but they don’t always have the skills to do it.
Eddie Turner:
Indeed. And I see this as a part of my work not only with ATD and the coaching certificate program but also through my work at Rice University, the Doerr Institute for New Leaders. They have a program called Coach Rice and it’s an ICF-approved program where they certify people as coaches. And so, we get lawyers and high-ranking officials and government and medical field and other areas coming into the program, very senior, very experienced people, and they come in and they take the training and you see them in those first sessions and they’re like “I thought I was doing this right. I’ve been doing this for years.”
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Well, in fact, attorneys use a lot of inquiry but my guess is that they have more leading questions than anything else. It would be fascinating to look at the differences among professions in terms of how they coach.
Eddie Turner:
Absolutely because, of course, as an attorney, you’re taught that you never ask a question if you don’t know the answer to it whereas in professional coaching, that’s the number one no-no because when you know the answer, that’s a leading question.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Exactly. And coming from a point of true curiosity is so different. It really involves a mindset shift. So, it must be neat to see the light bulb go off in those folks in Coach Rice.
Eddie Turner:
It really is. And then to see the transformation that they make by the time they finish the program four months later, it really is something. And everyone goes through, as you know, having gone through training, that it’s one of the most transformational events in a person’s life. you change as a result of being trained how to coach properly.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Yes. And you can bring it potentially to all other areas of your life as well. One thing I noticed as a parent is that as an executive coach, I ask a lot of open-ended questions. I have what according to the CMI parlance is an engaged style. And when I’m with my children, I find myself being so direct. So, awareness is the first step, let’s put it that way. I got completely transformed as a parent but I’m working at it.
Eddie Turner:
That’s priceless, absolutely. Well, if a leader is going to be a coach first, what types of goals should they focus on for their development and/or their development of employees?
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
So, good questions and two different questions. Let me take them one at a time, if I may.
Eddie Turner:
That’s a bad question. What kind of coach am I?
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
That’s always a hard one too but, to your credit, Eddie, they were two open-ended questions. No leading questions there.
Eddie Turner:
Yes. I have to give myself two demerits for that.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
So, question about what kind of goal a leader should set for himself or herself as a coach, in my mind, there’s one word to that and it’s versatility because as a coach, when you’re ICF trained, you’re really encouraged or maybe I should say forbidden, you’re forbidden from making any statements, giving any advice, sharing any perspective. It’s all inquiry, all curiosity, right? That’s what in the CMI framework we will call pull strategies. You show compassion, you focus on development and you ask questions. I believe that executive coaches like leader coaches are best served by being versatile, by having available to them a wide range of potential interventions, if you will, that’s kind of clinical but a wide range of potential strategies that they can use. And when they are versatile, then they can intentionally choose among the different strategies they have at their disposal in order to best meet the needs of that particular client at that particular point in time within their particular context. So, maybe 50% of the time they’ll be asking open-ended questions. Maybe the other 50% of the time they’ll be sharing feedback or sharing their perspectives and sometimes they’ll just have to tell someone how to do something but the more versatile coaches, the more mindful they can be about selecting the best strategy to meet the needs of the situation. So, that’s what, I think, a good goal for a leader coach is.
Eddie Turner:
Thank you. And then working with their employees, should they be focused more on performance or development.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Yeah, it’s so funny that you asked that because in one of the Coaching Mindset Index’s coaching foundations called Setting Goals, those are the two terms for the strategies. The push strategy is performance and the pull strategy is development. So, simply by virtue of the fact that you use those words, I think, you can see that this framework is a very intuitive one. We all get that some goals are related to the employee’s performance at their job, their responsibilities and some goals are related to their development. So, again, I think that the leader together with their direct report needs to decide which goals are most relevant within a particular conversation but at the broadest level, I think, there’s a neatness and a simplicity to say “Okay, instead of having an annual performance review where we don’t talk about it all year and then at the end of the year we tick off these boxes and HR is now happy, why not say “Okay, I’m going to coach you all year if you’re my employee and let’s set one really big performance goal and I get to be the one who mostly decides what that’s going to be. I want you to be able to embrace it and that can come from me as a representative of the organization. And let’s set one development goal and that can primarily come from you, the employee.”” Again, it has to be something that’s not inconsistent with organization goals or ethos or vision but as long as it doesn’t interfere with your performance, it’s consistent with your performance, why not let you choose it. Maybe it’s “I want to develop better presentation skills” or “I want to get involved in social media,” whatever it is. So, I think there’s a simplicity and a neatness to having one big performance and one big development goal all year or for a given year or a given period of time.

Does that answer your question?

Eddie Turner:
it does. Thank you, Dr. Hall. How would you summarize our conversation today?
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Well, if I were wearing my coaching hat, I would turn that question back on you like I noticed Marshall Goldsmith did, by the way, and you’ve answered it, I loved it but I’d do that. I guess, I would say that, for me, good coaching is all about intentionality. It’s about being versatile and being able to choose with confidence from among a number of strategies based not on what’s natural or comfortable for you, which, frankly, I think most of us do but choosing what is needed to help make progress on the goals of the person you’re coaching.
Eddie Turner:
Thank you. And you’re right. Yes, Marshall did throw that curveball at me. I typically like to hear how my guests thinks about the content and what is the most important message they want to leave and Marshall, yeah, he did put it back on me and I answered it. That was Marshall being Marshall.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
And it was very fun to watch. And I was tempted to do the same thing, Eddie, but only Marshall can get away with that. I can’t get away with that.
Eddie Turner:
When the number one leadership guru and number one executive coach in the world throws it back at you, you have no choice.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
That’s exactly right, yeah.
Eddie Turner:
Thank you.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Good call.
Eddie Turner:
So, the other thing I always wonder and love to get from people is the best piece of advice that you’ve ever heard or a quote that you use that you can share with our leaders in addition to the great content you provided during this discussion that can help us to keep leading.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Well, maybe I’ll share two, if it’s okay. You brought to mind something different when you said advice. One of my favorite quotes, I have a million but one I like from a remarkable leader, a very human, a very fallible leader who passed away recently, Jack Welch, and that is “Before you are a leader, success is all about growing yourself and when you become a leader, success is all about growing others.” So, that really captures for me the importance of coaching skills for leaders.

When you talk about advice, my mother would be very surprised to hear that that she had some advice for me that really made an impact in my career, but when I was young, she said “Hey, when you’re having a conversation with someone, if you ask them a lot of questions about themselves, the conversation tends to go really smoothly.” And in some ways, I think, I translated that into a career. So, thanks, mom.

Eddie Turner:
I love it. Well, thank you. Those are two great pieces of advice for us, from Jack Welch and from mom. Thank you for sharing that with our leaders.

Where can my listeners learn more about you, Dr. Hall?

Dr. Jennifer Hall:
My website is just www.DrJenHall.com. And even though I like people to call me Jen, Eddie, although you’ve been calling me Dr. Hall, I have put that doctor there because there are a million Jennifer Halls in the world. And so, I had to find a way to distinguish myself so people could find me. So, that’s my website. And my website company is fabulous but I have not given them content for years. So, there’s always so much they can do but that’s my website and I’ll update it soon. Your friend and my former fabulous client, Gen. Kolditz, is on the website. And so, for that reason, I haven’t scrubbed it.
Eddie Turner:
Well, he is a phenomenal man and a great resource to have and a great client testimonial. So, I don’t blame you for having that out there.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
So lucky to know him.
Eddie Turner:
We’re going to put that in the show notes so folks know how to find you, how to connect with you and get a chance to work with you as their executive coach. If they’re looking for one of the best executive coaches around, your work speaks for itself and so does your client roster. So, thank you for being a guest on the Keep Leading!® Podcast.
Dr. Jennifer Hall:
Thank you so much, Eddie. It’s been a genuine pleasure. Keep up the great work.
Eddie Turner:
Thank you so much.

And thank you for listening. That concludes this episode, everyone. I’m Eddie Turner, The Leadership Excelerator®, reminding you that leadership is not about our title or our position. Leadership is an activity. Leadership is action. It’s not the case of once a leader, always a leader. It’s not a garment we put on and take off. We must be a leader at our core and allow it to emanate in all we do. So, whatever you’re doing, always keep leading.

Thank you for listening to your host Eddie Turner on the Keep Leading!® Podcast. Please remember to subscribe to the Keep Leading!® Podcast on iTunes or wherever you listen. For more information about Eddie Turner’s work please visit EddieTurnerLLC.com.

Thank you for listening to C Suite Radio, turning the volume up on business.

The Keep Leading!® podcast is for people passionate about leadership. It is dedicated to leadership development and insights. Join your host Eddie Turner, The Leadership Excelerator® as he speaks with accomplished leaders and people of influence across the globe as they share their journey to leadership excellence. Listen as they share leadership strategies, techniques and insights. For more information visit eddieturnerllc.com or follow Eddie Turner on Twitter and Instagram at @eddieturnerjr. Like Eddie Turner LLC on Facebook. Connect with Eddie Turner on LinkedIn.